Tuesday, 17 November 2015

W4AAW Totally Remote Multi Multi Contesting


W4AAW Totally Remote Multi Multi Contesting.



How in the world did a M/M contest station deliver a top ten finish with no operators in the shack? Team W4AAW has taken remote operation to the next level - fully automated M/M contesting. There's even a zero-cost client option. We'll explain how we did this, give you a taste of what it's like to operate a M/M station remotely, and tell how you can join us in exploring this new frontier in amateur radio contesting. 

These webinars are brought to you by the WWROF http://wwrof.org/ 
Please consider supporting the WWROF http://wwrof.org/supporting-wwrof/

Tim - M0BEW. 

Saturday, 10 October 2015

WRTC 2018 Update by DL1MGB, DL8OBF and DL8MBS


WRTC 2018 Update by DL1MGB, DL8OBF and DL8MBS



WRTC 2018 Update in three parts: "WRTC 2018 Overview and News" by Chris, DL1MGB, President of the organization committee Competition Rules for 2018" by Uwe, DL8OBF, Director for Competition Work All Germany Contest - a new WRTC qualification event" by Christian, DL8MBS, WAG Contest Director.

Thanks to the wealth of material supplied from WWROF.

Tim M0BEW.

Wednesday, 9 September 2015

Detailed Analysis of Scoring Systems for UKAC Contests.

Detailed Analysis of Scoring Systems for UKAC Contests.

Background.
Discussions about the fairness of scoring systems in contests have probably been raging for as long as contests have existed. Over the past few years there has been a particularly fierce debate over the scoring systems used within the regular UK Activity Contests which take place between 6m and 10 GHz on Tuesday evenings. These have been a tremendously successful set of contests involving very large numbers of entrants – with over 600 in a year at 2m, over 400 on 6m and 70cm, and even over 200 on 23cm and 4m. Nevertheless, there continues to be a passionate debate on how they should be scored.

The activity which we are reporting on has attempted to providing a solid, evidence based analysis of a number of scoring systems, with the aim of identifying the fairest across the whole of the UK and was prompted by the RSGB Presidential Review of contesting which took place in 2015, and subsequent discussion and debate.

The team of volunteers carrying out this analysis have been drawn from both within and outside the RSGB VHF Contest Committee, and consists of

Andy Cook, G4PIQ (JO02) - Chair
Pete Lindsay, G4CLA (IO92)
Mike Goodey, G0GJV (IO91)
Ian Pawson, G0FCT (IO91)
Roger Dixon, G4BVY (IO82)
Richard Baker, GD8EXI (IO74)
John Quarmby, G3XDY (JO02)
Martin Hall, GM8IEM (IO78)
Steve Hambleton, G0EAK (IO93)

The objectives that we set ourselves was to come up with a scoring system which

• Will be recognised as fair by the vast majority of entrants across a wide geography

• Is straightforward enough to be easily understood and explained (and coded)

• Works for all bands from 6m through SHF

• Works for all sections of the contest (Open, Restricted and Low Power)

The primary rule in taking part in this analysis was to put any pre-conceptions behind us, and to use the real data from the newly published open logs of 2016 to tell us what was actually happening, and what would happen if we tried different schemes.

As a result of this work, we believe that we have come up with a proposal for a fairer scoring system for these contests, but in the process we have been surprised by much of what we uncovered, and by how inaccurate some of the speculation on the behaviour of different scoring systems was.

But – what does fair mean?

This was one of the most important questions that we had to answer. We decided that there were some factors that we either shouldn’t or couldn’t compensate for. These included operator skill and station capability and optimisation. Learning how to operate efficiently, accurately and tactically, and learning how to build the most competitive station are all skills which we develop in order to be successful in contesting. We didn’t think that we should be compensating for these hard learnt traits.

The other factor that we felt that we could not compensate for was a station’s take-off. There is no doubt that this is a major factor affecting success in VHF contests, but the effects can be tremendously localised - moving just 10 metres can turn a great site into a relatively poor one if this moves you behind an obstruction, be it topography or a building. Apart from being fiendishly complex to devise and calculate, publicly available topography data with its 50m lateral resolution and 10m height resolution does not look granular enough to provide a highly reliable handicap system. While it might work in many situations to provide a good estimate of the capability of a site, there will be a significant number of situations where it is inaccurate – and generally in the direction that a station will have a much poorer take-off than estimated. For these reasons, we have not attempted to compensate for take-off.

But – the biggest source of complaint which we have received over the years is that some stations are a long way from the centre of activity and so are naturally handicapped by their location. This was an area that we felt we could tackle, and the document outlines the approach we have taken.

What have we done?

We’ve generated the concept of a ‘potential score’ from a particular location. This is the score a notional station with a good 360 degree take-off could achieve from that location with good operating and good equipment. We generate the potential score for a square by taking the following steps,

1. Take the real logs from a specific UKAC event from 2016 and record the location of every logged station

2. For every large locator square (e.g. JO01) in the UK, identify a location approximately in the centre of activity

3. Calibrate the model according to the performance of the leading station on that band and section. Do this by having a sliding scale of the probability of working a particular active station based upon distance. (E.g. 40% chance of working stations up to 200km, 30% for stations from 200 to 300km, 20% for 300 - 400km, and so on up to 800 km). These percentages vary by band and section and are set such that the model predicts a similar mix of QSOs, score, multiplier total and best DX for the leading stations to that achieved in practice.

4. For every square in the UK, calculate a potential maximum distance based score.

5. Based on the performance of the leading station, set a radius inside which all multipliers / bonuses are worked, and calculate the multiplier / bonus score.

6. Calculate the overall potential score for every UK locator square for each band and section with each scoring system under consideration.

We have used standard deviation by population (st dev) of those potential scores across all UK squares as a means of identifying relative fairness of a scoring system. The results did not have a normal distribution about the mean so this is not the classical use of st dev. It was also necessary to take the root of the multiplier based scores so they could be compared with bonus based scoring systems. However we did check we end up similar types of distributions and so we believe the st dev was indicative of spread of results between squares.

We then went on to re-run the actual entrants’ logs for each of these contests and sections against each of the new scoring schemes to ensure that the effect on the real contest results is as we would expect it to be, and that we are not generating an obviously skewed set of results.

What scoring systems have we looked at?

We started by looking at some of the recent and common scoring systems, in particular

- 1 point per kilometre worked. No multipliers
- M5 – 1 point / km + a multiplier of x1 for all UK locator squares worked
- M7 – 1 point / km + a multiplier of x2 for all UK locator squares worked, and x1 for all others worked

The results of this initial analysis are shown below in Figure 3.


It takes the highest scoring square for a particular scoring system and marks that as 100%. It then shows the potential percentage of that score which could be achieved by an equivalent station / operator / take-off in all the other squares based on the analysis described above. The chart also shows a line with the average (mean) score by square for each scoring system, so squares above the line are doing better than the UK average on that scheme, and those below the line worse. The square by square impact of different scoring systems is more easily visualised below in Figure 4.


We are using the ‘tightness’ of the distribution of scores across the whole country for a particular scoring system as a measurement of fairness – the narrower the distribution, the fairer that particular scoring algorithm is. We have measured that tightness of distribution by taking the standard deviation of the scores in all squares. We took this analysis one stage further and looked at the tightness of the distribution across both all UK squares, and those squares with at high activity (those squares which have had 20 or more active stations in 2m UKAC from Jan – Aug 2016). This gives the ‘Most Active Squares” distribution shown below in Table 1.

So – what does this tell us, and why do we think this happens?

- When viewed across the UK as a whole, M5 and M7 are similarly fair. When viewed across the squares with significant activity, M7 is fairer than M5.

- M5 broadly favours stations in the North of the country, while M7 favours stations in the South.

- The differences are much smaller than many expected because the commonly held assumption of high activity levels in Europe is in-correct. The reason for this is that the UKAC events have become so successful that, even at 2m, less than 4% of the total QSOs are from outside the UK, and even in the JO squares, this figure only rises to just over 7%. Activity is completely dominated from the UK – in particular from activity in IO83, IO91, IO92 and IO93.

- The people who are most disadvantaged by both M5 and M7 (relative to 1 pt/km) in these contests are those in Central and Northern Scotland. By the time that you venture that far North, activity is very thin indeed.


Activity level by square in the 2m UKACs between Jan and Aug 2016 is shown below in Figure 5. For a station to count as active they must have worked 4 or more stations – this helps us remove busted calls from the data.


We have repeated this analysis for all bands up to 23cm, and for all sections. This data is included in the Appendix A, but the patterns within the results are consistent across the bands and sections.

A proposal had been made previously for a new M6 mechanism (UK squares + DXCC Countries). This was found to be not significantly more or less fair than either M5 or M7 and so was dismissed from further analysis.

The original multiplier scheme of M2 where all squares counted equally was also briefly tested, but likewise found to be less fair than both M5 and M7 and so was also dismissed from further analysis.

How do we test if this is a valid model?

Models are all well and good, but they are just that – models of the real world. We need to have some confidence that the model is not at odds with reality. This output of this model suggests that some of the best places to operate the UKAC contests from are in the IOx4 and IOx5 lines of squares.

Table 2 below shows the distribution of top 3 placings in the 2m Open section of the contest from January 2016 to September 2016. While, because of variations in station capabilities and take-offs, this in an imperfect check, there is a good selection of leading stations (66%) in the IOx4 and IOx5 line of squares. This analysis feels valid for the Open Section where there is reasonable representation of competitive stations in many of the major squares. That situation does not exist in the Restricted Section for example.


An addition measure of validity of this type of model was to compare the actual points per QSO of the leading stations across the country with the predicted results from the model as shown below in Figure 6. This gave a correlation coefficient R2 = 0.81 which implies a good fit between model and reality.


There has been a previous analysis based on a model developed by Martin GM8IEM during the 2015 Presidential Review of Contesting, which was presented to and accepted by the review workshop. It was subsequently scrutinised in detail by the Contest Committee and used in the development of B1 prior to the 2015 Supplemental Consultation. This work was based on the best information available at the time, i.e. population/amateur density both within the UK and Europe rather than the actual activity density which is used in this analysis. It is only this year’s launch by the VHFCC of Open Logs, allowing everyone to see what is actually being worked, which has enabled us to move from population density to this much better informed analysis based on real activity distribution. The previous model exaggerates the relative advantage enjoyed by stations in the south-east of England because of the low activity levels within Europe relative to the UK described earlier, and also because there is a very high population density peak in London which has never been reflected in VHF SSB activity. Nevertheless, despite its limitations, the general conclusion that Scottish stations are disadvantaged by the M7 scoring rule has been confirmed by our most recent analysis., which also demonstrated for the first time that stations in the south of England were disadvantaged to a similar level by M5.

A New Proposal – B2

Having established a baseline for the existing scoring systems, we set about looking at alternatives which would be fairer, particularly to the most disadvantaged areas, while retaining good fairness across the whole of the UK. We established earlier that multiplier based schemes inherently magnified the differences between successful and less successful areas, so we also looked at bonus schemes. In these scoring systems, rather than the 1 pt/km score being multiplied by a factor based on number of squares worked, an additional number of bonus points are awarded for each square worked. This approach is used in Scandinavia for their Nordic Activity Contests which have a very similar format to the UKACs.

Last year, VHFCC consulted on a bonus scheme which was called ‘B1’, and which was fairly narrowly rejected as a scoring system for 2016. We have looked hard at the best bonus options, looking at many different options – some simple, some complex. However, in the end we have found that B1 was a very good starting point for a fair scoring system, and by making a few small alterations to it, we are now proposing a system called ‘B2’ which is simpler and the fairest option that we have found to date. The bonus points per square for B2 are shown in the map below in Figure 7. Note that all non-UK squares count for 1000 bonus points.


The distribution of southerly UK squares at 500 points and setting non-UK squares at 1000 points may appear odd at first sight, but this mix results in the narrowest distribution of scores across the UK.

Another alternative – M8

We have also received some feedback that entrants would like to retain a multiplier based scheme, but not M5 or M7. We have spent some time looking for a fairer system than M5 or M7 across the whole country, and propose a new option called M8 which takes the same grouping of squares, but assigns them multipliers of x1, x2 and x3 as shown below in Figure 8. Again, this structure gives the narrowest distribution of scores across the UK that we have found


Figure 8 - M8 Multiplier Structure

This scheme is fairer across the UK as a whole than both M5 and M7, and achieves similar but a smaller impact to positions of the most disadvantaged stations.

The effect of these scoring system relative to the existing scoring system of M7 is shown below in Figure 9 & Figure 10Error! Reference source not found., again using the 2m Open section as an example.




From this analysis we learnt that

- B2 exhibits a higher degree of fairness than any existing scoring scheme, both across the UK as a whole, and in the higher activity areas. It is clear from the graphs that B2 has a narrower potential score distribution than M7 or M8 – even after correcting for the multiplicative structure of M7 and M8.

- M8 has a narrower distribution than M7 and so is fairer across the whole UK, and provides some correction to the most disadvantaged stations.

- B2 delivers a significant enhancement in score for the most badly disadvantaged stations uplifting them by a few places in the results table

- Neither B2 or M8 result in disruptive change to results across the majority of stations.

- Both B2 and M8 provides some incentive for stations to take the necessary time to complete aircraft scatter or meteor scatter contacts with the most remote stations. This won’t work for everyone, but could be a useful technique for mid-table stations to enhance their score, at the same time making the contest more interesting and rewarding for the stations on the far edges of activity.

One of the challenges of a variable bonus based scoring system like this is that it is not currently scored accurately during the contest by any logging packages except for MINOS. Not having the score calculated correctly during the contest doesn't stop you taking part, it just means you won't know your multiplier or bonus score accurately during the contest. After the contest, when you submit your log to the contest entry web pages, our entry system will re-calculate those multipliers or bonuses correctly. You can then use this score to populate the Claimed Score system if you like. However, knowing your correct score during the contest could help you optimise your strategy as you go along, although this can be achieved quite effectively just by making paper notes.

We recently ran a mini-survey to establish the importance of having a real-time display of score to entrants. MINOS (which will score system B2 correctly) is used by approximately 50% of entrants.

About another 20% currently use loggers or techniques which do not provide an accurate real-time view even with the current M7 system, and then of the remaining 30% of entrants, there was a mild preference towards accurate real-time scoring being important to them.

For these reasons, we don’t believe that the current lack of full scoring support in some logging software should prevent us proposing this option. We will discuss gaining support for this mechanism with the other major logging software authors.

Our testing shows that this scoring system works well to at least 23cm, but can deliver skewed results where QSO totals are very low. For this reason, we are not recommending the B2 scheme for the SHF (2.3 GHz – 10 GHz) UKACs and will be providing an alternative recommendation for these contests.

Impact on Actual Results

We have also reviewed the impact of B2 and M8 on actual contest results. In general, the impact on position in the tables has been relatively small to the majority of entrants. The biggest impact is on stations in the more remote parts of the UK (IOx6 line and North in particular), moving them usefully up the tables.

An example of the overall impact on position is shown below in Figure 11. This graph shows the positions of the entrants relative to M7 for M8 and B2. An entrant dropping below the trend line moves up the table, one moving above the trend line moves down it. You can see from this that this scoring system does not undermine the successful overall structure of the contests, but B2 in particular generally helps to promote the disadvantaged.


What’s different about this year’s analysis?
During last year’s review of scoring options, there were a number of points made against the original B1 proposal which we have tried to address in this study. Specifically
- Analysis flawed – based on population data. The analysis from 2015 was based on population, this analysis is based on actual activity levels
- The playing field cannot be levelled. It’s very true that we can’t completely level a playing field, but it’s not unreasonable to make it better where possible – that is what this proposal seeks to do
- B1 too complex. Both B1 and B2 are more complex than some other scoring systems, but they are not out of line with scoring systems used worldwide and are not actually difficult to keep track of - even manually
- Logging Programs won’t support it This has been covered in some detail in the paper. Software support is by no means essential. MINOS will support these options, and we will approach other software authors for support.
- Selection of Bonuses Arbitrary A wide variety of different bonus structures and levels were analysed during this work. The B2 proposal is the one which delivers the tightest distribution that we have found to date.
- B1 is non-reciprocal (i.e. points accrue to the station working the higher bonus square) This is true, but the approach here should encourage stations to make the effort to work the more distant stations which should result in higher scores for them.
- No objective stated for change / no way to measure success
This is quite straightforward. We measure success through the number of entrants and the geographical distribution of those entrants. It is hoped that this proposal will allow the contest to continue to grow, especially away from the main population areas.
- Contest should promote activity within the UK rather than between the UK and the Continent
This series of contests is actually about encouraging activity inside the UK, whether those contacts are to Europe, or within the UK. As shown earlier in this paper, these contests have been so successful within the UK that the QSO totals and score contribution from overseas QSOs are very small, even for the East Coast stations, and 96% of stations worked – even on 2m are in the UK.

Conclusions
We believe that the analysis carried out in this study is new, in that it takes a purely objective view of how the distribution of available stations impact a stations ability to score well in the UKAC contests. We believe that the B2 proposal outlined here is a very strong candidate for a new UKAC scoring system from 6m through to 23cm. It provides a fairer scoring system across the whole UK than either the existing M5 or M7 mechanisms, without changing the fundamental character of a set of remarkably successful contests. It should also make contesting more enjoyable for those in remote areas. This should result in maintaining and encouraging higher VHF activity levels in these remote areas of the country.
We don’t believe that the lack of support for real-time scoring for B2 in all logging software should be a block to the adoption of this scoring system and will be approaching software authors to provide support for this scoring system.
We commend the B2 mechanism as the fairest system which we have found to date, however, based on feedback from some entrants, we have also proposed an alternative multiplier based approach, M8, which improves in fairness on both of the existing M5 and M7 schemes, but is still less fair than this B2 proposal.










-
-

From https://www.rsgbcc.org/

Tim M0BEW.

Friday, 31 July 2015

IOTA 2015 MD4K MULTI-OP HP

IOTA 2015 MD4K MULTI-OP HP
Call: MD4K
Operator(s): G3NKC,G4XUM,M0BEW,M5RIC,MM0CCC,GM0RLZ.
Station: MD4K
Class: Multi-Op HP
QTH: IOM, EU116
Operating Time (hrs): 24

Summary:

Total:  2811     480     Total Score = 10548000

Comments:

Conditions really dreadful. 10m unproductive till Sunday morning.
Even short stuff on 40m was hard going.
Great contest with plenty of activity despite poor propagation.
Brilliant weekend with a solid team effort.

Thanks for everyone for the QSO's.
G3NKC, G4XUM, M0BEW, M5RIC, MM0CCC, GM0RLZ. MD4K Team.

http://www.iotacontest.com/contest/iota/2015/trophyWinners.php

Tim M0BEW.

Wednesday, 24 June 2015

IARU 2015 M0BEW SOABLP CW

IARU 2015 M0BEW SOABLP CW

Contest         : IARU HF Championship
Callsign        : M0BEW
Mode            : CW
Category        : Single operator
Overlay         : ---
Band(s)         : ALL BANDS
Class           : Low
Exchange        : 27
Operating time  : 06h 05m

 BAND  CW SSB HQ  Z POINTS  AVG
-------------------------------
  160   5   0  0  3     17 3.40
   80   0   0  0  0      0 0.00
   40   0   0  0  0      0 0.00
   20 154   0  9 15    528 3.43
   15 162   0 12 13    530 3.27
   10  11   0  6  3     21 1.91
-------------------------------
TOTAL 332   0 27 34   1096 3.30
===============================
      FINAL SCORE: 66 856


Operators       : M0BEW
Soapbox         : 


Usual battery powered field day setup.
Limited time operating during the Saturday afternoon.
Conditions really felt hard. Despite good RBN spots from 10m impossible to create any kind of run.

Tim M0BEW.

Monday, 22 June 2015

DXLOG CONTEST LOGGING SOFTWARE

DXLOG CONTEST LOGGING SOFTWARE.

I have used a number of different logging software over the years. I began with CT in the late 90's and moved over to Writelog in 2000. I used this exclusively for home operating till 2006. At this point I took a long break from contesting until returning to radio in 2013. 
When coming back I looked at everything new that was now available and ended up going with Wintest. It seemed stable, lots of operators were happy with it, and  had all the 1R and 2R options I needed. I tried it, liked the feel, and kept with it.
Recently I thought I'd take a look at DXLog. See screenshots for my setup.















I setup with a simple, basic, almost old school CT feel, but with everything needed visible. With a couple of shortcuts setup you can bring up cluster window and needed mult information.
Show mult window;















Show cluster window;















For a RTTY data seup it looks like this. (GRITTY is also supported.)















A nice, clean, no frills layout.

The few problems I had with Wintest, DXLog deals with fine.
Despite what I read about others experiences of Wintest performing solid I always had trouble getting Winkey to work reliably.
Unless I followed a specific sequence when loading up Wintest, Winkey would never initialize.
I would need to do the following, execute Wintest > Open the log > Type SETUP hit enter = Winkey detected. If I did anything to the log, e.g enter a qso, or dupe check etc before starting the setup Winkey would NEVER get detected, or more awkwardly if I had to change any thing mid contest with the comports it would break the cw, the whole process would have to be started again. Not ideal.
With DXLog once it had synced up, it just works, no matter when you re-initialize the comports. As it should. Very good.

Another issue Wintest had was with the DX cluser when connected to a busy node, such as RBN.  The system would become sluggish and unresponsive, CW was erratic with pauses in messages etc. Completely unacceptable, only option was to switch the cluster off.
DXLog in this case runs smooth despite the bombardment of spots coming though.

Things you'll need to get running if your using the recorder.
MP3 codec.
Download libmp3lame.dll and copy it into DXLog.net installation folder.
File libmp3lame.dll can be downloaded from here -
http://www.rarewares.org/mp3-lame-libraries.php

So, on the whole I'm very impressed, I'm converted.
This will be my go-to software for logging for the future.

73
Tim M0BEW.

Sunday, 21 June 2015

VHF Contesting Optimize Your Station Experience! by Joel Harrison W5ZN

VHF Contesting Optimize Your Station Experience! by Joel Harrison W5ZN.


VHF contesting is an exciting part of amateur radio and the contest scene. It presents some differences and challenges from HF contesting but is just as rewarding in achievement. Whether you're looking for a top 10 score, increasing your VUCC or WAS level or want to enjoy a weekend with a new amateur radio experience this information will be of benefit to you.

Thanks to the wealth of material supplied from WWROF.

Tim M0BEW.

Friday, 19 June 2015

RBN DATA RSGB 80M CLUB CHAMPS JUNE CW

RBN DATA RSGB 80M CLUB CHAMPS JUNE CW.

Below is the data I pulled off from last June's RSGB 80m Club Champs CW Contest.
I was interested to see how the my signal from a relatively simple system worked compared to previous 80m CC entrants that seem to do well.
For comparison I simply lifted the calls from the top ten entrants of the last session.
The system is 100w, 1/2w res dipole @ 30ft with ends at 10ft. Pictures speak a thousand words they say. See below.


DK0TE

DL9GTB

EA5WU

F5RRS
G0KTN


HA1VHF

HB9DCU

IK3STG

OE6TZE

ON5KQ

S50ARX

SE0X

SM6FMB
ZL2HAM



This is not perfect data, however it does show the signal put into the main areas of interest. Unfortunately there weren't many UK RBN active on 80m that evening to get a good spread of UK reference.

Results.
It's amazing to see the vast difference of signal between stations throughout the session. Geography will certainly play a role in this.
As to be expected, I'm not topping the charts all over, however its still quite pleasing to see how such a simple system performs.
Just for fun I have included some spots from the ZL RBN, showing who was spotted from there at our sunset.
I will try to continue to do these reports through future sessions. It'll be interesting to see the differences through the year with different darkness hours.

73. Tim M0BEW.

Tuesday, 16 June 2015

DRCG WW RTTY 2015 M0BEW SOABLP

DRCG WW RTTY 2015 M0BEW SOABLP

Contest         : DRCG World Wide RTTY
Callsign        : M0BEW
Mode            : RTTY
Category        : Single operator
Overlay         : ---
Band(s)         : 20
Class           : Low
Exchange        : 14
Operating time  : 00h 33m

 BAND QSO  C P DUP POINTS  AVG
------------------------------
   80   0  0 0   0      0 0.00
   40   0  0 0   0      0 0.00
   20  20 14 0   0     61 3.05
   15   0  0 0   0      0 0.00
   10   0  0 0   0      0 0.00
------------------------------
TOTAL  20 14 0   0     61 3.05
==============================
       FINAL SCORE:  854


Operators       : M0BEW
Soapbox         :
A little tester of DXLog using RTTY. 

Only caught last hour but the software seems solid. Very good.

Tim M0BEW

WWSA CW 2015 M0BEW SOABLP

WWSA CW 2015 M0BEW SOABLP

Contest         : WWSA CW
Callsign        : M0BEW
Mode            : CW
Category        : Single operator
Overlay         : ---
Band(s)         : ALL BANDS
Class           : Low
Grid square     : IO82VL
Operating time  : 01h 32m

 BAND QSO  Z  C DUP POINTS  AVG
-------------------------------
   80   0  0  0   0      0 0.00
   40   0  0  0   0      0 0.00
   20  38  6 21   0     44 1.16
   15  18  6 13   0     20 1.11
   10   7  3  6   0     13 1.86
-------------------------------
TOTAL  63 15 40   0     77 1.22
===============================
       FINAL SCORE: 4 235


Operators       : M0BEW
Soapbox         :
Oped from the usual field location.

Only a short session.
Activity didn't appear too high on in the last hours Sunday. Might have been higher on the Saturday, who knows.
Tested DXLog for the first time. Very impressed. Seemed solid.

Tim M0BEW.

Monday, 15 June 2015

CTU Contest University sessions 2015

CTU Contest University sessions 2015.
Icom America have uploaded the sessions from 2015 CTU @ Dayton.

CTU - Session 1 - Play by the Rules - Your Most Important Skill - N0AX

CTU - Session 2 - CW and RTTY Skimmers and the Rev Beacon Network - N6TV

CTU - Session 3 - Ten Ways to Increase Your Contest Score - K1DG

CTU - Session 4 - Enhancing Contest Station Audio - K9EID

CTU - Session 5 - Eyeball Sprint Contest "LIVE" - K1DG

CTU - Session 6 - Radio Contesting's Future, How Can You Help - K3LR

CTU - Session 7 - PopVote - Ten Ways to Increase Your Contest Score - K1DG

CTU - Session 8 - CQ Worldwide Contests - K5ZD

CTU - Session 9 - Contesting Hints & Kinks Q&A - W3LPL

CTU - Session 10 - Contesting Radio Performance - NC0B


Many thanks for making this media available.

73.
Tim M0BEW.

Friday, 12 June 2015

RSGB 80M CLUB CHAMPS 2015 JUN CW M0BEW

RSGB 80M CLUB CHAMPS 2015 JUN CW M0BEW

Contest         : RSGB 80 meter Club Competition
Callsign        : M0BEW
Mode            : CW
Category        : Single Operator (SO)
Overlay         : ---
Band(s)         : Single band (SB) 80 m
Class           : Low Power (LP)
Zone/State/...  : DX
Locator         : IO82VL
Operating time  : 1h29

 BAND   QSO DUP  POINTS   AVG
------------------------------
   80   134   1     134  1.00
------------------------------
TOTAL   134   1     134  1.00
==============================
       TOTAL SCORE : 134

Dupes are not included in QSO counts neither avg calculations

Operators       : M0BEW
Soapbox         :
Operated from the field at IO82VL.
Fun little session. Tested a relatively low dipole. SE/NW. Feed point @ 30ft and ends @ 10ft.
My idea was to put a signal on the band for 90 minutes using a typical G system and see how it fared, checking the RBN data against the 80m CC regulars.
Interesting data.

Tim M0BEW.

Wednesday, 10 June 2015

MW6V(M0BEW) CQWPXCW 2015 SOABLP

MW6V(M0BEW) CQWPXCW 2015 SOABLP.

WPX coincided with a holiday this year so I operated from the holiday cottage in Gwbert Ceredigion.
Tremendous QTH with the house being located right on the coastline overlooking the sea. Nothing serious, a casual affair. 
Ran with Wintest, a TS480 and a simple linked dipole. 

Sunset @ MW6V.
Operating position.
Living area.













My activity was on and off throughout the Sunday only as we traveled out on the Saturday.
Being at an unfamiliar location its sometimes hard to gauge the conditions, and with how well this location played towards the west made things even more confusing. However, things did feel pretty good.

Upon setting up the station it was clear there was a local noise. 
A wide band qrm destroyed the upper HF bands. Very disappointing, in any case it wasn't 24/7 and even went quiet for a sporadic hour or two so things were fine.  

Contest         : CQ World Wide WPX Contest
Callsign        : MW6V
Mode            : CW
Category        : Single Operator (SO)
Overlay         : ---
Band(s)         : All bands (AB)
Class           : Low Power (LP)
Zone/State/...  :
Locator         : IO72PC

Operating time  : 16h27

 BAND   QSO DUP  PFX  POINTS   AVG
-----------------------------------
  160     0   0    0       0  0.00
   80     0   0    0       0  0.00
   40     0   0    0       0  0.00
   20   877   1  517    1534  1.78
   15    30   0   14      60  2.00
   10     0   0    0       0  0.00
-----------------------------------
TOTAL   907   1  531    1594  1.78
===================================
       TOTAL SCORE : 846 414


It was great to part of WPX 2015 and a pleasure to operate from such an idyllic location, and give away the MW6V mult.

Thanks for the qsos.
Tim M0BEW.

Friday, 5 June 2015

CQ WPX CW 2015 MW6V(M0BEW) SOABLP

CQ WPX CW 2015 MW6V(M0BEW) SOABLP

Contest         : CQ World Wide WPX Contest
Callsign        : MW6V
Mode            : CW
Category        : Single Operator (SO)
Overlay         : ---
Band(s)         : All bands (AB)
Class           : Low Power (LP)
Zone/State/...  :
Locator         : IO72PC

Operating time  : 16h27

 BAND   QSO DUP  PFX  POINTS   AVG
-----------------------------------
  160     0   0    0       0  0.00
   80     0   0    0       0  0.00
   40     0   0    0       0  0.00
   20   877   1  517    1534  1.78
   15    30   0   14      60  2.00
   10     0   0    0       0  0.00
-----------------------------------
TOTAL   907   1  531    1594  1.78
===================================
       TOTAL SCORE : 846 414


Dupes are not included in QSO counts neither avg calculations

Operators       : M0BEW
Soapbox         : 

WPX coincided with a holiday this year so I operated from the holiday cottage in Gwbert Ceredigion.
Tremendous QTH with the house being located right on the coastline overlooking the sea. Nothing serious, a casual affair. 
Ran with Wintest, a TS480 and a simple linked dipole. 

My activity was on and off throughout the Sunday only as we traveled out on the Saturday.
Being at an unfamiliar location its sometimes hard to gauge the conditions, and with how well this location played towards the west made things even more confusing. However, things did feel pretty good.

Upon setting up the station it was clear there was a local noise. 
A wide band qrm destroyed the upper HF bands. Very disappointing, in any case it wasn't 24/7 and even went quiet for a sporadic hour or two so things were fine. 

It was great to part of WPX 2015 and a pleasure to operate from such an idyllic location, and give away the MW6V mult.

Thanks for the qsos.
Tim M0BEW.

Monday, 18 May 2015

KING OF SPAIN 2015 CW M0BEW SOABLP

KING OF SPAIN 2015 CW M0BEW SOABLP

Contest         : King of Spain Contest
Callsign        : M0BEW
Mode            : CW
Category        : Single Operator (SO)
Overlay         : ---
Band(s)         : All bands (AB)
Class           : Low Power (LP)
Zone/State/..   : DX
Locator         : IO82VL
Operating time  : 4h56

 BAND   QSO DUP DXC PRO  POINTS   AVG
--------------------------------------
  160     0   0   0   0       0  0.00
   80     0   0   0   0       0  0.00
   40    95   2  25  10     119  1.25
   20    86   1  27   6      97  1.13
   15   116   1  28   6     130  1.12
   10    20   0  13   0      22  1.10
--------------------------------------
TOTAL   317   4  93  22     368  1.16
======================================
         TOTAL SCORE : 42 320


Comments:
Operated from temp rural QTH. 
Limited operating time, 5hrs.
Fun contest. Activity seemed good.
A little light on EA's on the higher bands.
Spent too much time trying to make 10m work!

Tim - M0BEW.

Sunday, 10 May 2015

CQ-M INTERNATIONAL DX 2015 CW M0BEW SOABLP

CQ-M INTERNATIONAL DX 2015 CW M0BEW SOABLP

Contest         : CQ-M International DX Contest
Callsign        : M0BEW
Mode            : CW
Category        : Single Operator (SO)
Overlay         : ---
Band(s)         : All bands (AB)
Class           : Low Power (LP)
Zone/State/...  :
Locator         : IO82VL
Operating time  : 7h14

 BAND   QSO DUP P150  POINTS   AVG
-----------------------------------
  160     0   0    0       0  0.00
   80     0   0    0       0  0.00
   40    43   1   15      86  2.00
   20   201   3   36     426  2.12
   15   172   3   31     426  2.48
   10     0   0    0       0  0.00
-----------------------------------
TOTAL   416   7   82     938  2.25
===================================
       TOTAL SCORE : 76 916


Powered by Win-Test 4.10.0


Comments:
Operated from temp rural QTH.
QRV on and off between 12:30 till around 19:30.
Had a call from these guys during the late afternoon, looks like they were having fun.
http://www.amateurradio.com/kearsarge-mountain-trip/ 

Great sessions.
 

Tim - M0BEW.

Sunday, 3 May 2015

ARI INTERNATIONAL DX 2015 CW M0BEW SOABLP

ARI INTERNATIONAL DX 2015 CW M0BEW SOABLP

Contest         : ARI International DX Contest
Callsign        : M0BEW
Mode            : CW
Category        : Single Operator (SO)
Overlay         : ---
Band(s)         : All bands (AB)
Class           : Low Power (LP)
Zone/State/...  : DX
Locator         : IO82VL
Operating time  : 4h03

 BAND   QSO DUP DXC PRO  POINTS   AVG
--------------------------------------
  160     0   0   0   0       0  0.00
   80     0   0   0   0       0  0.00
   40     0   0   0   0       0  0.00
   20   124   2  23  18     345  2.78
   15    62   1  14   5     150  2.42
   10     0   0   0   0       0  0.00
--------------------------------------
TOTAL   186   3  37  23     495  2.66
======================================
         TOTAL SCORE : 29 700


Comments:
Operated from temp rural QTH. 
Conditions really didn't feel too good.
Gave TR4W a little try out on a new laptop instead of the usual Wintest.

Tim M0BEW.

Wednesday, 15 April 2015

Planning Your Contest Station by Craig Thompson K9CT

Planning Your Contest Station by Craig Thompson K9CT.



Craig Thompson, K9CT "Planning Your Contest Station." Craig will reveal lessons learned from building the K9CT contest station. He takes us through the thought process of finding land, selecting the antennas, and the shack layout.A must for anyone looking to build a contest station or improve their existing station.

Many thanks to wealth of material supplied from WWROF.
Tim M0BEW.

 

Monday, 13 April 2015

WRTC 2014 Documentary

WRTC 2014 Documentary.

WRTC 2014 Documentary Full - [Opens in new window]


The World Radiosport Team Championship (WRTC) is a competition between two-person teams of amateur radio operators testing their skills to make contacts with other Amateur Radio operators around the world over a 24 hour period. All teams use identical antennas from the same geographic region, eliminating all variables except operating ability.
WRTC2014 included 59 competing teams from 29 qualifying regions around the world. Competitors represented 38 different countries.
This video was edited and produced by James Brooks, 9V1YC, and runs approximately 59 minutes. James took advantage of 9 roving video teams to capture high definition footage of action at headquarters and out in the field, artfully telling the WRTC2014 story using the participants’ own words.

Many thanks to James 9V1YC for making this material available.

73
Tim M0BEW. 

Saturday, 11 April 2015

BS7H Scarborough Reef DXpedition

BS7H Scarborough Reef DXpedition.

BS7H Scarborough Reef DXpedition Full - [Opens in new wndow]



Located in the South China Sea just west of the Philippines, Scarborough Reef is without a doubt the rarest and most controversial entity on the DXCC list. Few places are harder to access, and fewer still create such intense debate.
Because of diplomatic disputes between its two feuding masters, China and the Philippines, the reef has seen just three brief expeditions in the past, keeping it at the top of the DXCC list for over a decade.
This film takes a close look at the Scarborough controversy, and follows the 2007 DXpedition team as they activate one of the rarest DXCC entities on Earth.

Many thanks to James 9V1YC for making this material available.

73
Tim M0BEW.

Friday, 10 April 2015

VP8ORK South Orkney Islands DXpedition

VP8ORK South Orkney Islands DXpedition.


Located just below 60 degrees south, the South Orkney Islands are one of only four DXCC entities within the UN Antarctic Treaty Zone. Both Britain and Argentina have scientific bases on the islands, but neither nation holds a recognized sovereign claim.
But even without national bureaucracy, staging a major DXpedition to a stateless, international piece of land is still challenging and expensive. Icebergs, rugged cliffs, and strict environmental regulations are just a few of the reasons why these islands are so difficult to activate.
Against the backdrop of stunning Antarctic scenery this film documents the 2011 MicroLite Penguins DXpedition to another one of the DX world's most wanted entities.

VP8ORK South Orkney Islands DXpedition Full

Many thanks to James 9V1YC for making this material available.

73
Tim M0BEW. 

Thursday, 9 April 2015

K4M Midway Island DXpedition

K4M Midway Island DXpedition.



Well known as a World War II battleground, a military base and a trans-oceanic fuel stop, today Midway has an entirely new purpose. Managed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service this ancient volcanic atoll is now a national wildlife refuge and gateway to the remote Northwest Hawaiian Islands.
Thousands of people once worked on Midway, but today only a handful of dedicated staff and volunteers remain. Their ongoing mission is to bring the atoll back to its natural state and maintain a precious national monument.
Working closely with Midway's new caretakers and mindful of the sensitive environmental issues, this 2009 DXpedition demonstrated how Amateur Radio is now a welcome activity inside one of America’s most protected wildlife reserves.

K4M Midway Island DXpedition Full

Many thanks to James 9V1YC for making this material available.

73
Tim M0BEW. 

Wednesday, 8 April 2015

ZL8R Kermadec Islands DXpedition

ZL8R Kermadec Islands DXpedition.



Separated from New Zealand by over 1000 km, and located at the junction of two opposing continental plates, the Kermadec chain of islands is one of the most seismically active regions of the world. Raoul Island, located at its northern end, is home to a large volcano which violently erupted without warning on March 17, 2006.
Six months later, under the close supervision of the New Zealand Department of Conservation, the Microlite Penguins DXpedition team was offered a rare opportunity to explore Raoul Island, and activate yet another of the DX world's most wanted.

ZL8R Kermadec Islands DXpedition Full

Many thanks to James 9V1YC for making this material available.

73
Tim M0BEW. 

Tuesday, 7 April 2015

VP8GEO South Georgia Island DXpedition

VP8GEO South Georgia Island DXpedition.



In Part 2 of the 2002 "Micro-Lite" DXpedition, the team fires up the stations once again, this time from the beautiful Antarctic paradise of South Georgia.
From the adventurous James Cook, to the unstoppable Earnest Shackelton, discover why South Georgia has been the Antarctic's most famous - and most exploited island for over 200 years. Then go behind the scenes with the operators to learn all the secrets behind "Micro-Lite" DXpeditioning, and why this time the team decided to leave the heavy stuff at home.

VP8GEO South Georgia Island DXpedition Full

Many thanks to James 9V1YC for making this material available.

73
Tim M0BEW.

Monday, 6 April 2015

VP8THU South Sandwich Islands DXpedition

VP8THU South Sandwich Islands DXpedition.



Described by Captain James Cook as the most horrible place on Earth, the South Sandwich Islands are also one of the most logistically difficult places for a DXpedition. Using only 100 watts and verticals, this experienced team took on the South Atlantic's tough environmental challenge by heading to Southern Thule - the planet's most southerly piece of land outside the Antarctic Treaty Zone.
Operating within the remains of an old Argentine base, (and amongst 100,000 penguins!) this video documents the 2002 Microlite DXpedition to the South Sandwich Islands, and shows how a team set out to bring back the fun of old-time DXing.

VP8THU South Sandwich Islands DXpedition Full

Many thanks to James 9V1YC for making this material available.

73
Tim M0BEW.


Sunday, 5 April 2015

A52A Bhutan DXpedition

A52A Bhutan DXpedition.


Tucked away, far up in the Eastern Himalayas is the tiny Kingdom of Bhutan - one of the most isolated and unknown nations on Earth - and one of the most wanted DXCC entities of all time. This film goes behind the scenes at the 2000 A52A DXpedition to Bhutan, with some of the best operators ever assembled.

 A52A Bhutan DXpedition Full

Many thanks to James 9V1YC for making this material available.

73
Tim M0BEW.

Saturday, 4 April 2015

VK0IR Heard Island - Outpost at The Edge

VK0IR Heard Island - Outpost at The Edge.


Heard Island is a pristine and isolated natural wilderness, and one of the few places on the planet completely free from any human introduced species. Its remote, inhospitable, and almost as far from civilization as possible. This might explain why it has been twice occupied and twice abandoned.
Originally released for viewing to the general public on broadcast television, this 1998 documentary traces the early nineteenth century American sealing history through the Australian occupation in the 1950's, and finally to the famous 1997 DXpedition.
Many thanks to James 9V1YC for making this material available.

73
Tim M0BEW.